Christine Hradsky No Comments
Accounting Method

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act allows more companies to qualify for the cash basis method and elect out of complex inventory and percentage-of-completion accounting rules.

Thanks to changes included in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), many more businesses can now use the simpler and more-flexible cash method of accounting for federal income tax purposes. The new law also includes some other tax accounting changes that are good news for small businesses. Like many TCJA changes that apply to businesses, these provisions are permanent. Here’s what you need to know.

Expanded Use of Cash Method Accounting

Before the TCJA, C corporations with average annual gross receipts of more than $5 million for the previous three tax years generally weren’t allowed to use the cash method. The same was true for entities with average annual gross receipts of more than $5 million that were:

  • Partnerships with C corporation partners, or
  • Limited liability companies (LLCs) treated as partnerships for tax purposes with C corporation members.

Instead, these taxpayers were required to use the accrual method of accounting. That limited their opportunities to manage taxable income over several years by altering the timing of income and deductions to minimize the cumulative federal income tax liability for those years.

Under the TCJA, for tax years beginning after 2017, cash method accounting is allowed for these taxpayers if their average annual gross receipts for the three previous tax years didn’t exceed $25 million. The cash method is allowed even if the purchase, production or sale of merchandise is an income-producing factor for these taxpayers.

This change will allow many more C corporations — as well as partnerships and LLCs with C corporation partners and members — to use the cash method in 2018 and beyond.

Expanded Use of Simplified Inventory Accounting Rules

Under the TCJA, accounting for inventories will be much easier for many businesses for tax years beginning after 2017. This provision of the law generally exempts businesses with average annual gross receipts of $25 million or less for the three previous tax years from the requirement to use inventory accounting for federal income tax purposes. Instead, these taxpayers can either account for inventory costs:

  1. As the cost of nonincidental materials and supplies that are simply written off when they’re used or consumed, or
  2. In the same manner as the costs are treated for financial accounting purposes.

In addition, businesses with average annual gross receipts of $25 million or less for the three previous tax years are also exempt from the complicated uniform capitalization (UNICAP) rules that mandate capitalizing many expenses as inventory costs. This change applies to producers and resellers. Before the TCJA, many businesses with average annual gross receipts in excess of $10 million were required to follow the UNICAP rules.

Long-Term Real Property Construction Contracts

Before the TCJA, construction companies with average annual gross receipts in excess of $10 million for the previous three tax years were generally required to use the percentage of completion method (PCM) to calculate annual taxable income from long-term contracts for the construction or improvement of real property. This method of accounting is less favorable, because it requires contractors to recognize taxable income earlier than under the completed contract method.

Under the TCJA, for tax years beginning in 2017 and beyond, businesses with average annual gross receipts of $25 million or less won’t be required to use the PCM for contracts expected to be completed within two years.

Contact Us

Accounting for taxes can be complicated. Fortunately, tax reform legislation has expanded the eligibility requirements for some simplified tax accounting methods for small businesses. Contact your tax advisor to determine whether these alternatives could work for your business in 2018, as well as for additional tax planning opportunities under the TCJA.


Our firm provides the information in this e-newsletter for general guidance only, and does not constitute the provision of legal advice, tax advice, accounting services, investment advice, or professional consulting of any kind. The information provided herein should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, accounting, legal, or other competent advisers. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a professional adviser who has been provided with all pertinent facts relevant to your particular situation.Tax articles in this e-newsletter are not intended to be used, and cannot be used by any taxpayer, for the purpose of avoiding accuracy-related penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer.The information is provided “as is,” with no assurance or guarantee of completeness, accuracy, or timeliness of the information, and without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including but not limited to warranties of performance, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose.

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